Our 2020 vision

Vote now for better cycling!

Please vote now for the cycle network you and Hayling need!

Hampshire and Havant will only invest with community support, so they need your votes to know where is the best place to support walking and cycling.

No votes means no money!

To vote for Hayling, simply go to Hampshire’s CommonPlace map here, search for Hayling or drag Hayling Island to the centre and expand. But don’t vote automatically for every one, they need to know which are MOST important.

Click on the icons to see what they propose, and up-vote cycling (and walking) facilities you agree with!

The Votes button is pink before you vote, and goes green after you vote :

Cycle Hayling and others have already put some ideas up. But if you see more things that need doing, click the ‘Have your say’ button to add any you think SHOULD be there. But please follow our guidelines:

  • You can’t edit comments after they’re made, so get them right first time.
  • Make it very clear in the first sentence what you’re asking for.
  • The map was created for emergency measures for Covid-19 social distancing, but we’re now adding more long term requests. We don’t know how long it will stay around.
  • If you don’t know quite what to say, ask Cycle Hayling to help.
  • Always be polite and respectful to all road users, and to the council.
  • And do drop us a line to tell us where you’ve added something!

Our vision for a cycle-friendly Hayling

Let’s not beat about the bush. We can’t say that Hayling is a cycle-friendly island until we’ve hit all these targets:

  • Safe and pleasant to cycle anywhere on the island and into Havant
  • Safe for parents to cycle with children of 3 and up
  • Safe cycling for unescorted children of 12 and up
  • All-weather, smooth cycling to anywhere
  • Traffic-free cycle or shared paths everywhere there is fast-moving traffic
  • Quick and safe crossing at junctions
  • Direct routes suitable for commuting, not huge diversions
  • Routes to all schools, shops, health centres, leisure and community areas
  • Safe places for children and adults to learn and practice
  • Good signs and maps to show people where to go
  • Plenty of secure bike parking where people want to stop
  • Most school-children walk or cycle to school most of the time

And those things probably mean:

  • 30 mph maximum speed limit everywhere on the island
  • 20 mph speed limits in all residential roads
  • Automated enforcement of speed limits
  • Traffic calming, to discourage speeding
  • Home Zones to claim the streets back for people, not cars

Are these achievable?

Yes, they’re being achieved all over Britain, and all over the world.

  • In Holland, trips up to 5 miles are just as likely to be by bike as by car, and about half of Dutch school-children ride to school every day. The Dutch average lifespan is believed to be half a year longer because of it, and their health-span, when they’re healthy enough to enjoy life, is 2 years longer.
  • Many British cities are following Holland – London and Manchester leading the charge. Some London boroughs are now becoming mini-Hollands for cycling.
  • 94% of Portsmouth roads have had 20 mph residential speed limits since 2008, and saw 22% fall in accidents.

What do we need?

  • Permission from landowners and councils
  • Community backing
  • Plans
  • Money, possibly lots, but not all at once
  • Patience 🙁

If you agree with all that, sign up at CycleHayling.org.uk/signup.
Even better, join our campaign committee.

Now is the time! If not now, when?

The politics of cycle infrastructure

Why is building cycle paths so hard? Why does it take so long? Is it the councils? Money? Lack of will? Too much regulation?

After 9 years of Cycle Hayling, we’re finally building our own cycle path at Denhill Close (with council money), and we’re finding out the problems for ourselves.

So who is responsible for building cycle paths? Everyone, and no-one. And that’s the problem.
Continue reading “The politics of cycle infrastructure”


Cycle Hayling update – March 2019

Since 2016, we’ve been publishing a monthly Cycle Hayling column in the Hayling Islander to keep everyone up to date with what’s going on (which we now publish on our website for anyone who doesn’t get the Islander).

However, as that’s aimed at the general public, we can’t always speak as freely as we’d like, and so we haven’t kept our supporters or our web site updated as much as we should have.

So here’s a summary of what’s been going on, to save you reading the whole website (which you’ll see we’re gradually updating). A lot has happened, so you can click any heading below to see it in bite-sized chunks ….

Continue reading “Cycle Hayling update – March 2019”


Havant’s new Cycling and Walking Plan!

Havant Borough Council has announced that it will be starting work on a formal Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan shortly.

This is REALLY important because :

  • A formal plan unlocks much more future government funding
  • Implementing it becomes a formal policy of the whole council, not just the cycling team
  • It forces developers to show how their housing plans fit into OUR bigger plan
  • It forces all of us to plan for the best long term solution, rather than just for quick wins

Continue reading “Havant’s new Cycling and Walking Plan!”


One school’s bike revolution

Do watch this inspiring little video from Sustrans, showing one Primary School’s bike revolution. Turns out kids can have fun and get free and healthy exercise at the same time. And reduce congestion and parking problems at school.

Hayling’s schools support cycling, and our cycle routes to school are (slowly) getting better. Cycle Hayling wants to see kids on Hayling having fun and cycling to school. Wouldn’t it be great if by 2018 we could say that this video could have been made on Hayling!

Continue reading “One school’s bike revolution”


Proposal to reduce the speed limit on the Northney route

Consultation is now open on the council proposal to reduce the speed limit from 40 mph to 30 mph on the section of road between the Stoke end of Copse Lane and Northney village. Details of the proposal, ref. number AS/TRO/298, can be found at www.havant.gov.uk/tro

This is a route used by many cyclists to get on and off the island, so Cycle Hayling supporters may like to submit their views to the consultation, which is open until Friday 11th March 2016. Formal comments can be made via one of the following methods:

  • Using the online response form at the above web address
  • By email to tro@havant.gov.uk
  • In writing to the acting solicitor to the council :
    Sara Bryan
    Acting Solicitor to the Council
    Public Service Plaza
    Civic Centre Road
    Havant PO9 2AX

Update from Cycle Hayling

This is the text of an email we sent to all Cycle Hayling supporters with email addresses on 5th December 2013…

Welcome to all our new supporters. You are helping us promote better cycling facilities on the Island.

In this update:

  • Good news for the ‘Safe routes to school’ project
  • More good news…
  • …and even more
  • New ‘Park and Stride’ scheme
  • An appeal about cycle lights
  • Watch out, there’s a thief about!
  • North East Hayling Residents Association
  • Hayling to Paris ride – update

Continue reading “Update from Cycle Hayling”